My letterpress work, revealed

Knowing how seriously delinquent I am in showing some examples of my letterpress printing on this site, I was pleasantly surprised to learn that one of my recent submissions to the Amalgamated Printers’ Association (APA) bundle is shown on the APA website. As you will see if you follow the link, this “Title Page Project” required participants to use only the copy provided, and to print on a 5 × 8 page.

I thought this was a great study project, not only because I have a strong desire to print books, but also because it presented a few realistic constraints from which a myriad of solutions would evolve. Looking at others’ solutions in relation to my own is very revealing to me. I would really like to see the APA sponsor more of challenges like this one; it may help to encourage the development of real skills in budding printers like myself.

ATF Wordsearch

Here is the solution to the typefaces wordsearch puzzle I composed for the yet-to-be-published 2004 ATF Conference keepsake. I think it is a fairly tough puzzle: a 15 × 15 grid containing 31 words. You can generate your own wordsearches, and many other types of puzzles with Discovery School’s Puzzle maker. It used to be free.

ATF Conference 2004 – Typefaces Wordsearch

I hope you’ve enjoyed my typefaces wordsearch from the 2004 keepsake. How many faces did you find? Ten? Twenty? Don’t give up yet! There are a total of thirty-one arranged forward, backward, upward, downward and diagonally. Below you’ll find the puzzle—minus the unused letters—and the list of words hidden therein. If you simply can’t wait any longer, the solution is posted here.

A special nod to Discovery School’s very nifty Puzzlemaker for help arranging so many words in such a tight grid.

L T R A J A N U S O R E M O H
Q R I E U S E B I U S B G
U A K A A T S K I L L A
A H F E J E I D O S P A H R
D C Y N P A L C S D A A
R T T E D N I A C S O D M
A U I D I S O V O S O R O
T D N P L O I T I L F I N
A D A E P N C N O E O A D
L V E R E H F U N M U N T
R O N D O R C P V I N R O A
N I H C O C S A L O C I N V
B U L M E R I Z N S I I
G N A L K N I H T O R T E M R
D N E G E L A U T E P R E P

Blado

Bulmer

Caslon

Deepdene

Eusebius

Fournier

Garamond

Hadriano

Homero

Ionic

Janson

Kaatskill

Klang

Legend

Louvaine

Metrothin

Nicolas Cochin

Old Dutch

Orplid

Perpetua

Privat

Quadrata

Rhapsodie

Rondo

Scotch Roman

Solemnis

Tippecanoe

Trajanus

Union Pearl

Vanity Fair

Zapf Civilite

ATF Wordsearch Solution

ATF Conference 2004 – Wordsearch Solution

L T R A J A N U S O R E M O H
Q R I E U S E B I U S B G
U A K A A T S K I L L A
A H F E J E I D O S P A H R
D C Y N P A L C S D A A
R T T E D N I A C S O D M
A U I D I S O V O S O R O
T D N P L O I T I L F I N
A D A E P N C N O E O A D
L V E R E H F U N M U N T
R O N D O R C P V I N R O A
N I H C O C S A L O C I N V
B U L M E R I Z N S I I
G N A L K N I H T O R T E M R
D N E G E L A U T E P R E P

Blado (13, 2, s)
Bulmer (1, 13, e)
Caslon (9, 5, se)
Deepdene (4, 11, n)
Eusebius ( 5, 2, e)
Fournier (13, 8, s)
Garamond (15, 2, s)
Hadriano (14, 4, s)
Homero (15, 1, w)
Ionic (11, 8, s)
Janson (6, 4, s)
Kaatskill (5, 3, e)
Klang (5, 14, w)
Legend (6, 15, w)
Louvaine (12, 8, sw)
Metrothin (14, 14, w)
Nicolas Cochin (13, 12, w)
Old Dutch (2, 11, n)
Orplid (5, 11, n)
Perpetua (15, 15, w)
Privat (15, 15, n)
Quadrata (1, 2, s)
Rhapsodie (15, 4, w)
Rondo (1, 11, e)
Scotch Roman (12, 5, sw)
Solemnis (12, 6, s)
Tippecanoe (2, 6, se)
Trajanus (2, 1, e)
Union Pearl (10, 10, nw)
Vanity Fair (3, 10, n)
Zapf Civilite (8, 13, n)

ATF Conference

I first became aware of the American Typecasting Fellowship several years ago. I learned of the organization—which aims to continue the tradition of hot metal typography—through Mike Anderson, who urged me to join after I had spent several exhilarating days in his printing shop and typefoundry. Mike also urged me to apply for Monotype University, which I successfully completed in August of 2003. I realized during that intense week that everyone involved in Monotype University—including some of the students—was a member of ATF as well. The two are essentially inseparable. It is the vast body of experience, passion for the craft, and desire to pass it on to a new generation that brings them together.

Did I mention that the biannual ATF Conference is coming up, September 3-5?

The Typefoundry at the Private Press of Ian Schaefer

Monotype Foundry

I’ve been studying—albeit sporadically over the past several years—the design and manufacture of once-commonplace metal printing types. I hope that this section will someday reflect great progress in my efforts to establish a small, working typefoundry in my letterpress shop. Recently, a new ‘Monotype’ Compostition Caster was acquired for the foundry. There are some pictures of the successful move.

The Engraving Machine

Yet another project—an old pantographic engraving machine in need of a little attention. More here.

A ‘Monotype’ Disaster

On Tuesday, May 11, 2004, I received a long awaited shipment from Georgia. The freight was three pallets of machinery which I hoped would be my first ‘Monotype’ system, the centerpiece of which was a very fine and relatively new, British-made, 16 × 17 ‘Monotype’ Caster. Then, the story takes a horrible turn…Take a look at the pictures.

Typefoundry Inventory

Since the arrival of my second ‘Monotype’ machine, I’ve started to record an inventory of what’s in the foundry .

ATF to the Rescue!

In the two weeks since the Monotype Disaster, I have received a great deal of support, both moral and practical, from various members of the American Typecasting Fellowship. Many of these folks also happen to have been my instructors at Monotype University Five. I must thank Mike Anderson, Paul Duensing, Rich Hopkins and Jim Walczak for their continued efforts on behalf of my would-be typefoundry. This is quite a community.

Hot Metal Heartbreak

The machines arrived on Tueday. The caster is damaged. Almost certainly was rolled on it side. Among the casualties are the jaw tongs spring box and connecting rods, cam shaft stand, locking bars connecting rod, mould blade connecting rod, bridge lifter, speed gauge, as well as the keyboard spindle. Ouch. I had hoped to be up and running before the ATF conferemce in August. That seems unlikely at this point.

The big question for me is this: has the machine suffered such damage that I should just find another machine and use this one for its parts?

Still Waiting

The Monotype system is scheduled to arrive Tuesday. “Time Log” shipping has proven to be discouraging. It has taken longer than expected and cost more than I had hoped to pay. However, I am so delighted to know the machine will be here soon. Once it is in position in the shop, I will have forgotten about the long wait.

They all think I’m crazy

The Monotype is on the way. Shipping confimed. Shipping paid (Don’t ask). Three pallets weighing in at 2400 lbs: 1300 for caster, 750 for keyboard (seems high to me), 350 for compressor and miscellaneous stuff. Arrival is set for the week of the 3rd of May. Hopefully enough space has been cleared in the shop,…it all works out on paper.
This machine formerly belonged to Paul Duesing, at his shop in Watkinsville, Geogia. I first met Paul last year at Monotype University Five in Terra Alta, West Virgina, where he, along with rest of the Monu U faculty, taught several of us the Monotype Composition System. Paul is a rather legendary figure among the fine press, typography and typefounding circles. I feel very fortunate to be ‘inheriting’ some of his equipment.